On-Board Payload Data Compression Workshop

23-24 October 2014

Palazzo Cavalli Franchetti
Venice, Italy


 


Introduction

In remote sensing systems, a major problem lies in the limited availability of bandwidth and resources necessary for acquisition, processing and transmission of the images related to a given terrestrial area, as acquired by the sensors mounted on an airborne or spaceborne remote platform. Since the spatial, spectral and radiometric resolutions of optical and radar sensors are getting finer and finer, the amount of collected data is huge. New-generation sensors aim at increasing the resolution even further. Because of the huge amount of data, powerful compression algorithms are required to match the available channel resources. Moreover, many Earth Observation satellites are required to transmit data on-ground in real time, this means that compression devices with very high throughput are requested.

In remote sensing systems, a major problem lies in the limited availability of bandwidth and resources necessary for acquisition, processing and transmission of the images related to a given terrestrial area, as acquired by the sensors mounted on an airborne or spaceborne remote platform. Since the spatial, spectral and radiometric resolutions of optical and radar sensors are getting finer and finer, the amount of collected data is huge. New-generation sensors aim at increasing the resolution even further. Because of the huge amount of data, powerful compression algorithms are required to match the available channel resources. Moreover, many Earth Observation satellites are required to transmit data on-ground in real time, this means that compression devices with very high throughput are requested.

In science missions, one of the challenges is to have the capability to transmit to the ground stations a high amount of data through a limited downlink. EUCLID, the new “Cosmic Vision” mission of the European Space Agency, dedicated to understanding the nature of dark energy and dark matter, is facing this challenge. The mission will investigate the distance-redshift relationship and the evolution of cosmic structures. It achieves this by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies and clusters of galaxies out to redshifts ~2. EUCLID will map the large-scale structure of the Universe over the entire extragalactic sky, with unprecedented accuracy. Such a mission implies large technological and design efforts, since it will generate a huge amount of data, to be sent to Earth in a short period of time. Thanks to on-board data compression, it will be possible to transmit all the data generated on-board, without any restriction, allowing maximizing the science return.

The On-Board Payload Data Compression Workshop aims to bring together all the professionals working in the field, to share the latest ideas and developments and to pave the way for the future technological challenges. This Workshop is co-organised by ESA and CNES and it will be hosted in Venice (Italy) on 23 and 24 October 2014.



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